Sex Addiction Recovery: Texas First Intimacy Anorexia Recovery Group

Intimacy AnorexiaTexas’ first therapeutic men’s intimacy anorexia recovery group is set to begin January 2017 in McKinney. Although the Dallas-Ft. Worth and surrounding areas have a strong therapeutic and 12 Step recovery community for sex, love and pornography addiction, recovery resources for those who also struggle with intimacy anorexia (IA) are rare and therapist led support groups non-existent.

The men’s IA group will be the first of it’s kind in Texas. It is led by Dr. Janice Caudill, a CSAT and the first certified IAT (Intimacy Anorexia Therapist) in the state. The IA group will have a work-group format, with members completing workbook exercises specifically designed for IA recovery.

Participants will have the opportunity to practice intimacy-boosting skills and well as learning trigger-busting strategies that help defuse the anger and emotional intensity that intimacy deprived spouses often feel. The men’s group builds in support, feedback, and accountability for strengthening both IA and sexual recovery.

The group will meet twice a month on Thursdays from 7:30 to 9:00 pm. Membership requires an initial evaluation. Contact McKinney Counseling & Recovery for details.

Dr. Janice Caudill is the founder and Clinical Director of McKinney Counseling & Recovery. MCR offers individual, couples, group therapy, webinars, workshops and 3-day intensives for sex addiction recovery, intimacy anorexia, intimacy deprivation and partners of sex addicts, kintsugi couple recovery intensives for wounded hearts struggling with the impact of sex addiction, infidelity, love addiction or love avoidance, intimacy anorexia, or relational traumaMCR serves the McKinney, Plano, Allen, Richardson, Frisco, Prosper, Carrollton, Lewisville, Dallas and surrounding areas.
All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition, does not create a client-therapist relationship, and is not a substitute for care by a trained professional. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors, omissions, losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.
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Sex Addiction Recovery: Gratitude for the Growing McKinney Recovery Community

recovery community

When I began my private practice in 2009 I was excited to be the first Certified Sex Addiction Therapist to serve the McKinney area. However, I quickly realized the difficulties my clients faced in maintaining and sustaining sobriety in a city with no S-groups (Twelve Step groups devoted to sex addiction recovery) and essentially no recovery community. That meant at a minimum a drive to Plano, Dallas or one of the fledgling Sex Addicts Anonymous (SAA) or Sexaholics Anonymous (SA) groups available to recovering people in other cities. For clients from distant locations already traveling a distance to get to me in McKinney, it made participation in a recovery community virtually untenable on a regular and frequent basis. Given my firm belief that healing happens in community, the lack of one in McKinney saddened and frustrated me.

So I have watched with tremendous gratitude as that community has slowly grown in my city over the last 7 years. It started with the Saturday and then Thursday Primary Purpose SAA groups serving those struggling with sexual compulsion. I am grateful to the First Baptist Church for offering their facility for these groups, as well as the broader faith communities in supporting Celebrate Recovery and beginning to address issues related to pornography and sexual addiction.

2016 has seen another growth spurt in the McKinney with the Shepard Building in Adriatica sponsoring not one but two new SAA groups – a Tuesday evening Primary Purpose group and a Sunday evening traditional SAA group. I’m particularly pleased that the Sunday Hope and Recovery group uses a different format from the existing groups because I believe that one of the hallmarks of a healthy recovery community is not just having multiple groups, but having a diversity of styles and formats to meet the diversity of needs in recovering individuals – different strokes for different folks. So McKinney now has multiple SAA groups with diverse formats that meet in both religious settings and a secular setting.

I am also excited at no longer being the only professional in McKinney with specialty certification to treat sex and porn addiction. The first several years in my private practice were lonely ones for me. However, the Shepard Building is fast becoming a hub for professionals who specialize in treating sex and pornography addiction as well as betrayal trauma experienced by spouses and children. Although we all practice independently from each other, our close proximity in the Shepard Building allows for us to work collaboratively when possible.

We have kind of become our own professional tribe. Consequently, I’m appreciative of the colleagues who join me in supporting recovery in McKinney. That includes Gary Kindley, LPC, CSAT who continues fight his way north from his primary office in Dallas to facilitate his Wednesday night Facing the Shadows men’s psychotherapy group. This group has been running for several years and is still going strong.

Debra Larsen, LPC-S, certified by the American Association of Sex Addiction Therapy and the Association of Partners of Sex Addicts Trauma Specialists, works with partners of sex addicts and couples trying to restore their marriages in the wake of betrayal. She also brings her 20+ years of experience working with adolescents to helping teens and young adults impacted by a parent’s addiction. Given that I am now seeing second and third generations of sex addiction now, her expertise is going to be vital in helping break the cycle.

Ingela Edwards, LPC, who was formerly a co-facilitator for my Partner Empowerment Groups and Married and Alone Groups, is also certified as a Sexual Recovery Therapist and Certified Clinical Partner Specialist. Ingela works with recovering sex addicts and their partners, as well as counseling couples in the healing process.

I am excited about the most recent addition to the Shepard Building specialists. Steve Kelly, LPC, CSAT-c is well respected throughout the professional community and has been a beloved and trusted source of inspiration for many in recovering individuals he has  worked with in residential treatment centers. Steve served in pastoral ministry for over 20 years. Not only is Steve a talented addiction therapist, he has a special gift for helping his clients navigate through the spiritual growth so important in the recovery process.

As for myself, I am a psychologist and CSAT who works with men and women struggling with sex or pornography addiction. In addition, I am a Partner Recovery Therapist, founding member of the Association of Partners of Sex Addicts Trauma Specialists, and helped develop a trauma model for healing spouses dealing with Sex Addiction Induced Trauma – the Multidimensional Partner Trauma Model. I have a passion for helping marriages heal from the impact of sex addiction and a frequently co-occurring relationship pattern called intimacy anorexia. I frequently do 3 and 4 day intensives to help couples begin to move past the tremendous damage compulsive sexual betrayal and intimacy anorexia inflict on the relationship.

Although McKinney now has a solid foundation in sex and porn addiction recovery resources, we still have a long way to go. Unfortunately, I see no signs that McKinney will not grow in need for even more S-group meetings in the future. While the recovery community has grown for the recovering addicts, there are still few resources for spouses and the north Texas area has virtually no recovery community resources for intimacy anorexia.

So my wish list for the future definitely includes COSA, S-Anon or POSA Twelve Step meetings for spouses to add to the Partner Empowerment psychotherapy groups offered by McKinney Counseling & Recovery. A growing need that I hope adolescent specialists such as Debra Larsen can help with is to create resources for the growing number of teens ensnarled by pornography or sex addiction. A final item on my wish list is the emergence of an intimacy anorexia recovery community. McKinney Counseling & Recovery plans to help launch its growth by recruiting for the first men’s intimacy anorexia psychotherapy group this fall.

I have watched with gratitude as the McKinney recovery community has grown in recent years. I hope to see it grown even more in the years to come.

Dr. Janice Caudill is the founder and Clinical Director of McKinney Counseling & Recovery. MCR offers individual, couples, group therapy, webinars, workshops and 3-day intensives for partners of sex addicts and wounded hearts struggling with sex addiction, infidelity, love addiction or love avoidance, intimacy anorexia, or relational trauma in the McKinney, Plano, Allen, Richardson, Frisco, Prosper, Carrollton, Lewisville, Dallas and surrounding areas.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition, does not create a client-therapist relationship, and is not a substitute for care by a trained professional. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors, omissions, losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.
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Surviving Betrayal: Boundaries, Not Ultimatums

BoundariesWhen we first hear about setting boundaries regarding the behavior of another person, it is often hard to see how that differs from the same old ultimatum that got us nowhere in the past.

You do this or else.

If that ever happens again, you’ll be sorry.

What sets boundaries apart from ultimatums is that when we set a boundary, we are asking only one person to respect our boundaries: ourselves.

When we issue an ultimatum, we expect someone else to change. When we set a boundary, we challenge ourselves to change.

When we set a boundary, we decide what we can live with in the future and we decide how we will respond if confronted with that behavior again.

When we set a boundary, we don’t do it to punish someone else. We do it to protect ourselves. In setting a boundary, we may say: One more deception, one more affair, and I get out of this relationship to save myself and my sanity.

Notice that a healthy boundary can be set without ever saying the word you. Sometimes we don’t even have to express our boundaries aloud to another person, although to be fair we may want to tell others what the consequences of their actions may be. But we don’t have to do that. Because when we set a boundary we are not demanding that another person change.

TODAY I AM READY TO MAKE MY OWN CHANGES. I WILL SEEK THE COURAGE TO SET HEALTHY BOUNDARIES AND TO DEMAND CHANGE ONLY OF MYSELF.

From Surviving Betrayal: Hope and Help for Women Whose Partners Have Been Unfaithful * 365 Daily Meditations by Alice May

Dr. Janice Caudill is the founder and Clinical Director of McKinney Counseling & Recovery. MCR offers individual, couples, group therapy, webinars, workshops and 3-day intensives for partners of sex addicts, recovering couples and wounded hearts struggling with sex addiction, infidelity, love addiction or love avoidance, intimacy anorexia, or relational trauma.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition, does not create a client-therapist relationship, and is not a substitute for care by a trained professional. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors, omissions, losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.
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Betrayal Trauma: Understanding Your Trauma Triggers

Trigger FingerTrauma triggers are anything that serve as a reminder of painful events in your life. They can be people, places, things, or situations. Thoughts, feelings, and sensations may also be connected to trauma memories. It is important to begin to understand your trigger patterns because they will often be the source of your emotional rollercoaster taking off.

Sometimes the triggers are obvious for betrayal survivors, like sex scenes in movies. At other times the triggers may be unclear, like the vague but so distressful feeling that something is wrong or the sense that you aren’t emotionally safe in the absence of any apparent reason. Your confusion in that type of situation is compounded by an inability to figure out if this is your intuition telling you that something is wrong, or if it is merely your fear about something that happened in the past that your are feeling in the now. In either case, you are left with the urge to either do something right away to make the discomfort go away, or the sense that there is nothing you can do, that you are paralyzed by shock, trapped by not knowing what to do, or folding into a sense of helplessness and despair.

Your triggers elicit an instantaneous response because they are controlled by the part of the brain that regulates survival responses, the type of split second responses that occur before the logical part of the brain can analyze the situation. Some women, in some situations, may respond with fight urges, others with flight urges. Most will alternate between the betrayal trauma “Should I stay or should I go?” dance of indecisiveness. And when there is no real answer, when we are unable to successfully take action – sometimes because we don’t know what the real truth is – or when the emotional response to the trigger feels overwhelming, we default to a feeling of freeze or of being trapped.

Trigger responses can be huge even for what we think of as minor events. Triggers are kind of like a molecule. Different events from different points in time can connect together to form giant trauma molecules. For example, hearing a love song may bring up a cherished memory of a vacation with your spouse, followed by the awareness of how much you trusted him them, that is now attached to the memory of discovering betrayal and new awareness that you can’t trust him now and the fear that you may never be able to trust again. Alternatively, being left out of a luncheon invitation with a group of friends may bring up a lifetime of feeling like you don’t fit in or are being rejected by others, now compounded by a feeling of being rejected by your betraying spouse. Trauma triggers are complicated because they may literally be attached to hundreds of memories.

Betrayal triggers are particularly difficult because at its core betrayal is always a breach of trust. We all have millions of experiences with trust and mistrust across our lifetimes. Trust is built upon or destroyed with every interaction, both big and small, that we have with others, and with ourselves. When trust issues are triggered you feel the full weight of all the trust breaches of your life. And any person you happen to be with at that moment has no idea how much you are experiencing on the inside.

Beginning to identify your triggers is an important early step towards preventing or decreasing avoidable triggers and will give you a greater sense of predictability in the chaos of betrayal trauma recovery. You can eventually use this knowledge to build in trauma-savvy self-care that will help soothe your mind, body and spirit.

I encourage you to design your own trauma molecule to help you identify your triggers. Fill in as many of the triggers on your trauma molecule as you can today. Add additional triggers as you become aware of them, especially ones that you might initially have recognized as a trigger. Logging your triggers over time will likely make it clear to you that although many of your triggers do create an instantaneous reaction, others are actually cumulative and build up over time until you hit your threshold. Threshold triggers can often be neutralized or greatly diminished by self-soothing early in the build up.

MoleculesDr Janice Caudill is the founder and Clinical Director of McKinney Counseling & Recovery. MCR offers individual, couples, group therapy, webinars, workshops and 3-day intensives for partners of sex addicts and wounded hearts struggling with sex addiction, infidelity, love addiction or love avoidance, intimacy anorexia, or relational trauma in the McKinney, Plano, Allen, Richardson, Frisco, Prosper, Carrollton, Lewisville, Dallas and surrounding areas.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition, does not create a client-therapist relationship, and is not a substitute for care by a trained professional. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors, omissions, losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.
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Sex Addiction Recovery: Embrace Your Darkness

Facing Our Darkness

“Strangely enough we strengthen love in ourselves when we raise into consciousness the shadow side of our lives. Conversely, when we keep negative feelings out of sight, they smother the love that seems to lie deeper and closer to the real self. This is probably why there is so much pain in not loving. The life that is not able to express the love which is so integral to it grows deformed.”

Elizabeth O’Connor

We all have parts of ourselves we would like to reject, to cast into the shadows and pretend they no longer exist. Those of us who struggle with addictions have cause to fear our shadow sides because they have so often in the past led to great pain for ourselves and our loved ones.

Early recovery often feels like an epic battle between the part of ourself that wants to heal and our addict who wants to keep us in darkness. We often seek to sever our addict from our lives. However, we do so at the cost of learning about our own darkness and discovering the unmet needs that gave rise to our addict.

When we go deeper into recovery, we realize that we must be willing to explore our own darkness, that when we refuse to honor and come to love that part of ourself it will continue to push to get our attention.

Are you willing to examine and come to terms with those aspects of yourself you reject?   To explore the wounds that drives your darkness?   To come to love those wounds and understand the motives that give rise to its behavior?   To learn to love the wounds, so they can finally heal?  To embrace your darkness so you can more fully experience your light?

“How odd that if we reject what is painful, we find only more pain, but if we embrace what is within us – if we peer fearlessly into the shadows – we stumble upon the light.”

From Broken Open: How Difficult Times Can Help Us Grow by Elizabeth Lesser

Dr Janice Caudill is the founder and Clinical Director of McKinney Counseling & Recovery. MCR offers individual, couples, group therapy and 3-day intensives for partners of sex addicts and wounded hearts struggling with sex addiction, infidelity, love addiction or love avoidance, intimacy anorexia, or betrayal trauma in the McKinney, Plano, Allen, Richardson, Frisco, Prosper, Carrollton, Lewisville, Dallas and surrounding areas.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition, does not create a client-therapist relationship, and is not a substitute for care by a trained professional. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors, omissions, losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.

 

 

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Surviving Betrayal: Loving Feelings

Loving FeelingsLoving him at a time like this feels so wrong. So weak. So self-destructive. Surely a strong, confident woman could walk out without regret.

But sometimes, even in our pain, we feel the love. And that is okay. That doesn’t make us wrong or weak. It isn’t a cause for shame.

None of our feelings are wrong. Feelings are not facts, they are not defects in our character, they do not brand us in any way. They are sim¬ply a reflection of what is in our hearts. And at times like this, our hearts are bound to be filled with more conflicting emotions than we know how to handle.

It is okay to be confused about how we feel. It is okay to be sure that we love him one minute and to know without a doubt that we hate him the next minute. These are only feelings. And even though others may have told us that our feelings are wrong, they are not. We are free to have our feelings and to sort through them over time.

If we feel love today, if we remember the good times even when our pain overwhelms us, we don’t have to judge ourselves. Hope is not a weakness. And love is never shameful.

I can focus on my healing today without judging myself for any of my emotions, including any loving feelings I may have for my partner.

From Surviving Betrayal: Hope and Help for Women Whose Partners Have Been Unfaithful * 365 Daily Meditations by Alice May

Dr Janice Caudill is the founder and Clinical Director of McKinney Counseling & Recovery. MCR offers individual, couples, group therapy and 3-day intensives for partners of sex addicts and wounded hearts struggling with sex addiction, infidelity, love addiction or love avoidance, intimacy anorexia, or relational trauma in the McKinney, Plano, Allen, Richarson, Frisco, Prosper, Carrollton, Lewisville, Dallas and surrounding areas.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition, does not create a client-therapist relationship, and is not a substitute for care by a trained professional. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors, omissions, losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.
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Sex Addiction Recovery: Understanding Discovery

Medical Leadership“Discovery” is a term that has come to mean the event or period of time in which a sex addiction is discovered by a partner or spouse. Partners of sex addicts describe discovery as an intensely traumatic experience that hits with the impact of an earthquake, upending her life and casting doubt on everything she believed to be true about her relationship. It is usually the start of a long period of living on an emotional rollercoaster.

For the sex addict, discovery is when the public life and secret life begin to come together, often with a huge crash. Although some sex addicts voluntarily disclose their sexual betrayals to their partner, research indicates that more often the discovery occurs when the partner stumbles across evidence or follows her suspicions down a trail of questions. This starts the process of  the addict slowly leaking the information out, typically as series of confessions rather than a carefully decided upon and executed disclosure.

The earthquake for the recovering sex addicts I counsel is most often the intensity and duration of their partner’s response. Focusing on owning and recovering from the compulsivity that drives sexual acting out can be difficult to do for the addict who is repeatedly ducking and diving from his partner’s pain and anger, or the addict who is trying to save his relationship by tending to his partner’s pain but somehow his instincts on how to do so only manage to make her the discovery worse.

Ironically, while the addict may be feeling shock or shame at the dawning realization of the damage the addiction has done in his life or feeling fear the relationship cannot survive, or remorse for the pain his partner is now experiencing, some may simultaneously feel a sense of relief. Secrets are a burden that when carried over time numbs the bearer to how heavy they really are. Letting go of those secrets during discovery can be a wake up call helping the addict to lighten the load by releasing the secrets. For many, beginning a recovery process instills a sense of hope that may have previously been buried.

Discovery can be a tumultuous time for the addict experiencing a host of seemingly contradictory thoughts, feelings, and sensations. Although research on the discovery process exists, the majority is from the perspective of the partner. Despite numerous subjective accounts, little has been done on systematically examining the discovery process from the recovering addicts perspective. If you would like to contribute to this body of knowledge, consider participating in the “Discovery” survey. The information will be used to help make professionals and recovering individuals more aware of ‘discovery’ issues that need to be addressed during recovery.

Dr Janice Caudill is the founder and Clinical Director of McKinney Counseling & Recovery. MCR offers individual, couples, group therapy and 3-day intensives for partners of sex addicts and wounded hearts struggling with sex addiction, infidelity, love addiction or love avoidance, intimacy anorexia, or relational trauma in the McKinney, Plano, Allen, Richardson, Frisco, Prosper, Carrollton, Lewisville, Dallas and surrounding areas.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition, does not create a client-therapist relationship, and is not a substitute for care by a trained professional. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors, omissions, losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.
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Surviving Betrayal: Relief from the Pain

How long will the betrayal hurt?

How long will it hurt?

What most of us want more than anything is for the pain to stop. And we want it to stop now. But we eventually learn there is nothing healthy we can do to make the pain go away quickly. Healing is a gradual pro­cess. And anything we do to force an immediate solution is likely to cre­ate more pain in the long run.

How long will it hurt?

Sometimes it will hurt until our partner realizes his mistake and works on repairing the damage. Sometimes it will hurt until we make up our minds to accept the reality of what has happened. Sometimes it will hurt until we’ve finished the normal grieving process. It may be a week, a month, a year. Or more. Sometimes we think the pain has eased and something happens to open the wound again.

How long will it hurt?

The truest answer is that the healing process is different for each of us, and the outcome isn’t predictable. There are no shortcuts and no sure­fire formulas. Live with the pain, accept its reality, and practice healing behaviors, until the hurt begins to ease. The way is not over, but through.

Today I won’t look for a quick fix for my pain. I understand that healing will take time. I understand that no one can tell me how much time it will take. I will stop expecting immediate relief.

                                                                          From Surviving Betrayal: Hope and Help for Women Whose Partners Have Been Unfaithful * 365 Daily Meditations by Alice May

Dr Janice Caudill is the founder and Clinical Director of McKinney Counseling & Recovery. MCR offers individual, couples, group therapy and 3-day intensives for partners of sex addicts and wounded hearts struggling with sex addiction, infidelity, love addiction or love avoidance, intimacy anorexia, or relational trauma in the McKinney, Plano, Allen, Richardson, Frisco, Prosper, Carrollton, Lewisville, Dallas and surrounding areas.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition, does not create a client-therapist relationship, and is not a substitute for care by a trained professional. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors, omissions, losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.
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Sex Addiction Recovery: Control Your Trustworthiness

 

You have no control over your partner’s level of trust — you only have control over your own trustworthiness.

 

Dr Janice Caudill is the founder and Clinical Director of McKinney Counseling & Recovery. MCR offers individual, couples, group therapy and 3-day intensives for partners of sex addicts and wounded hearts struggling with sex addiction, infidelity, love addiction or love avoidance, intimacy anorexia, or relational trauma in the McKinney, Plano, Allen, Richardson, Frisco, Prosper, Carrollton, Lewisville, Dallas and surrounding areas.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition, does not create a client-therapist relationship, and is not a substitute for care by a trained professional. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors, omissions, losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.
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Surviving Betrayal: The Last To Know

Colleagues gossiping with sad young businesswoman in foreground at a bright office

The friends and family who knew the truth but never told us may look to us like accomplices in our betrayal. If they cared about us at all, how could they leave us in the dark? Surely they owed it to us to tell.

Being the last to know is humiliating and infuriating.

Today our challenge is to understand that friends and family who do not tell are making the best decision they can in a very difficult situation. They are caught in the middle. They are betraying someone they care about, risking somebody’s anger, no matter what they do. We can’t count on friends or family members to have a clear picture of our inner lives, thus making such a decision simple and straightforward.

Today we are also beginning to understand that we may have thought we were ready for the truth before it came to us. But rarely is that so. Most of us see the truth as soon as our hearts and spirits are prepared for the struggle ahead. The signs are there. We will read them when we are ready. Others do us no favors by forcing us to look at something we aren’t yet ready to face.

We will work to let go of our anger at those who knew but didn’t tell. We will understand that their silence was the best decision they could make. And it may have been the best decision for us as well.

Today I will try to see that my friends and family have not wronged me. I don’t need to extend my anger to include them.

                                                                          From Surviving Betrayal: Hope and Help for Women Whose Partners Have Been Unfaithful * 365 Daily Meditations by Alice May

Dr Janice Caudill is the founder and Clinical Director of McKinney Counseling & Recovery. MCR offers individual, marriage counseling, group therapy and 3-day intensives, marriage workshops for partners of sex addicts and wounded hearts struggling with sex addiction, infidelity, love addiction or llove avoidance, intimacy anorexia, or relational trauma in the McKinney, Plano, Allen, Richardson, Frisco, Prosper, Carrollton, Lewisville, Dallas and surrounding areas.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any condition, does not create a client-therapist relationship, and is not a substitute for care by a trained professional. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors, omissions, losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.
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